The Healthcare Entrepreneur Blog

Keeping your computer clean – and performing well

by Tannus Quatre PT, MBA | April 15th, 2009 | 1 response

With more and more of the healthcare office spent in front of a computer, our need for quick performance and reliability grows each day.  Here’s a quick “how-to” for taking care of the inside of your computer in order to keep it clean and healthy – somewhere you may not have even thought to look.

I have a dirty secret. I’ve never cleaned my computer. Sure, I’ve dusted my monitor, but I haven’t taken off the cover or tried to reach the crumbs lurking inside my keyboard.

“Your computer could fry if you don’t keep it clean,” says Jonathon Millman, chief technology officer for Hooplah Interactive.

Dust clogs the vents behind your computer, which causes your CPU to heat up-and heat is the biggest cause of component failure in computers. Regular cleaning could save you costly maintenance fees down the road.

Keep your computer in tip-top shape by following Millman’s guide to a spotless computer system.

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Tannus Quatre PT, MBA is a private practice consultant and principal with Vantage Clinical Solutions, Inc., a nationwide healthcare consulting and management firm located in Bend, OR and Denver, CO.  Tannus specializes in the areas of healthcare marketing, strategy, and finance, and can be reached through the Vantage Clinical Solutions website.

Tannus Quatre PT, MBA
Tannus Quatre is a private practice consultant and principal with Vantage Clinical Solutions, Inc., a nationwide healthcare consulting and management firm located in Bend, OR and Denver, CO. Tannus specializes in the areas of healthcare marketing, strategy, and finance, and can be reached through the Vantage Clinical Solutions website.
  • Damien Howell

    From someone with very recent experience losing a hard drive, it is very expensive in terms of time to recreate your hard drive. Start with delayed communication with stakeholders because your email is not functioning, add time to perform initial problem solving, followed by ti (lost buissness) me necessary to replace/repair hardware; followed by reloading applications, finding out some softward applications and companies are not longer in buissness, followed by paying for newer software applicastions to replace lost software applications; followed by learning new software applications to replace applications that can not be replaced; followed by finding pass words to get up grades on software applications, followed by reloading data; just to name a few of steps. Having a top notch back up/clone system is expensive, but I now think it is cheaper than recreating a lost hard drive.